On my flight to JAX. Or maybe it was ATL…

On my flight to JAX. Or maybe it was ATL…

(Source: cheisenberg)

Will We Ever Run Out of New Music?

This evolved into a really interesting video. In fact, one of the insights discussed in this video strikes me as being pretty profound, if it turns out to be correct. It’s right in line with lots of other research, so it seems quite plausible to me. I downloaded the referenced paper and am rolling the implications around in my head for my own research.

The auroral current can also be used for transmitting and receiving telegraphic dispatches. This was done between 8:30 and 11:00 in the morning, on September 2, 1859, on the wires of the American Telegraph Company between Boston and Portland, and upon the wires of the Old Colony and Fall River Railroad Company between South Braintree and Fall River, among others. The length of time during each positive wave was only, however, 15 to 60 seconds. The following account came from between Boston and Portland.Portland: “Please cut off your battery, and let us see if we cannot work with the auroral current alone.”Boston: “I have already done so. We are working with the aid of the aurora alone. How do you receive my writing?”Portland: “Very well indeed - much better than when the batteries were on; the current is steadier and more reliable. Suppose we continue to work so until the aurora subsides?”Boston: “Agreed. Are you ready for business?”Portland: “Yes, go ahead.”This went on for a period of two hours. After the current from the aurora subsided, the battery was reconnected. The parties at Fort Braintree and Fall River did the same for over an hour, over a distance of 40 miles.(Photo credit: Stephane Vetter)

The auroral current can also be used for transmitting and receiving telegraphic dispatches. This was done between 8:30 and 11:00 in the morning, on September 2, 1859, on the wires of the American Telegraph Company between Boston and Portland, and upon the wires of the Old Colony and Fall River Railroad Company between South Braintree and Fall River, among others. The length of time during each positive wave was only, however, 15 to 60 seconds. The following account came from between Boston and Portland.

Portland: “Please cut off your battery, and let us see if we cannot work with the auroral current alone.”

Boston: “I have already done so. We are working with the aid of the aurora alone. How do you receive my writing?”

Portland: “Very well indeed - much better than when the batteries were on; the current is steadier and more reliable. Suppose we continue to work so until the aurora subsides?”

Boston: “Agreed. Are you ready for business?”

Portland: “Yes, go ahead.”

This went on for a period of two hours. After the current from the aurora subsided, the battery was reconnected. The parties at Fort Braintree and Fall River did the same for over an hour, over a distance of 40 miles.

(Photo credit: Stephane Vetter)

Uludag National Park in Turkey. Photographer: Tunç Tezel. (via space.com)

Uludag National Park in Turkey. Photographer: Tunç Tezel. (via space.com)

So wait. Boy bands are a thing again? I thought terrible music cycles took longer than this…

theworldwelivein:

Our Galaxy over Queenstown (by Stuck in Customs)

theworldwelivein:

Our Galaxy over Queenstown (by Stuck in Customs)

jtotheizzoe:

Night Skies

Oh. My. Goodness.

We know about my weakness for time-lapse videos of beautiful stuff. This is just feeding the beast.

These are some star shots captured on a road trip by a time-lapse production company called T-Recs. I love how they blend views of long, threadlike star trails with detailed (labeled!) shots of pinpoint stars across the cosmic canvas. 

Have you ever seen shooting star paths so dramatic? And the scene with the reflection on the car windshield … that’s one I’ve never seen before. Bravo.

HD, full-screen, speakers up, sense of awe at the ready … you know how we do things.

(by T-Recs)